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10 Movies You Should Watch on Amazon Prime This Holiday Season

There are so many choices everywhere now. Time is really important for all of us and watching a movies which is not worth our time is the most irritating thing we can face. So here I have lessen down your work and listed the movies which you should watch on Amazon Prime this holiday season:


1) Moonlight




Some of Moonlight's most important scenes take place near water, always shifting, water proves to be a potent symbol for protagonist Chiron's journey through the film. The film follows Chiron from his time as a young man growing up, impoverished, in Miami, to his tragic, conflicted adulthood. The film's three acts, set during different stages of his life, show him struggling with his identity and sexuality, as he develops an attraction to his best friend and faces pressure and bullying from other boys his age. Buoyed by excellent performances - particularly Mahershala Ali's, which won him an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. Moonlight is a powerful character study, one rife with mesmerizing imagery.

2) Nightcrawler 


A deliciously wicked mix of Network and Taxi DriverDan Gilroy's feature directorial debut was a shot of adrenaline to the fall 2014 movie season and it's destined to age well over time. Jake Gyllenhaal is unforgettable as an ambitious sociopath who takes up a job as a stringer-a freelance cameraman who captures footage of wrecks, arrests, etc. and sells it to local news stations for their morning coverage. Cinematographer Robert Elswit captures Los Angeles like we've never seen it before, and Gilroy covers the arc of Gyllenhaal's Louis Bloom with an intensity and curiosity that almost makes you like the guy. Dark, biting, and dare I say kind of thrilling? Nightcrawler is one of the best films of the past decade.

 

3) Manchester by the Sea




This bleak drama, directed by playwright Kenneth Lonergan, is set in the titular town of Manchester, a town Lee Chandler (Casey Affleck) would prefer never to return to. Chandler lives out his days working as a janitor in Quincy, away from any connections to his past. Tragedy brings him home; his brother Joe (Kyle Chandler) dies, leaving behind a teenage son, Patrick (Lucas Hedges), and a will asking Lee to take care of him. Manchester by the Sea is a deeply personal drama, examining the ways disaster can wear away at a person's soul, and whether it is possible to come back from the brink. Despite the premise, the movie is not gloomy from start to end; the script allows for plenty of humor and warmth throughout, making for a film that captures the complexity of life.

4) Silence 


The title of Martin Scorsese's latest is loaded, at once a reference to God's tendency not to reply to the pleas and appeals of followers, a nod to the culture of secrecy maintained by Japanese Christians during Japan's Edo period and an acknowledgment of the state you'll be left in after watching. Silence isn't an easy movie going experience-it isn't an easy conversation point, either, but that's because it shouldn't be. Scorsese knows it. Most likely Shusaku Endo, the author of the text from which Scorsese adapted his film (and had sought to adapt since the 1990s), knew it too. Who is innocent in Silence? Who is guilty? If we can rule out Japanese villagers put to death for their beliefs, and we certainly can, then that leaves culpability at the feet of their spiritual and bureaucratic leaders, both at odds with one another while the faithful remain suffering between them as priests and politicos treat them as fodder for proving the illegitimacy of their opponents' belief structures. The film's complexity is expected from Scorsese, one of the greatest living filmmakers of our time, but it's also a reinvention in style, a picture that both feels totally unlike anything he's shot before and cannot be mistaken as anyone's but his.

5) 10 Cloverfield Lane 


Though originally developed from a script titled The Cellar10 Cloverfield Lane was acquired by Bad Robot, a production team owned by J.J. Abrams, and turned into a spiritual successor to found-footage monster movie Cloverfield. John Goodman gives an incredible performance as a paranoid man who abducts a young woman (Mary Elizabeth Winstead) and holds her captive in an underground bunker under the premise that a catastrophic event has rendered the Earth's surface uninhabitable. The movie oozes creepiness, eschewing traditional jump scares in favor of a more cerebral, psychological horror.

6) The Handmaiden 


There are few filmmakers on Earth capable of crafting the experience of movies like The Handmaiden so exquisitely while maintaining both plot inertia and a sense of fun. (Yes, it's true: Park has made a genuinely fun, and often surprisingly, bleakly funny, picture.) The film begins somberly enough, settling on a tearful farewell scene as Sook-hee (Kim Tae-ri) is carted off to the manor of the reclusive and exorbitantly rich aristocrat Kouzuki (Cho Jin-woong), where she will act as servant to his niece, Lady Hideko (Kim Min-hee). But Sook-hee isn't a maid: She's a pickpocket working on behalf of Fujiwara (Ha Jung-woo), a conman scheming to get his mitts on Hideko's assets. (That's not a euphemism. He only wants her for her money.) The reveal of Sook-hee's true intentions is just the first of many on The Handmaiden's narrative itinerary. Park has designed the film as a puzzle box where each step taken to find the solution answers one question while posing new ones at the same time. But you're here to read about the sex, aren't you? It's in the sex scenes between the two Kims that Park shows the kind of filmmaker he really is. The sex is sexy, the scenes steamy, but in each we find a tenderness that invites us to read them as romance rather than as pornography. We're not conditioned to look for humanity in pantomimes of a sexually explicit nature, but that's exactly when The Handmaiden is at its most human. There's something comforting in that, and in Park's framing of deviance as embodied by the film's masculine component. We don't really need him to spell that out for us, but the message is welcome all the same.

7) It Comes at Night 


It's a shame that a misleading marketing campaign soured moviegoers on this one because if you came waiting for some monster that literally comes at night, you're in for a disappointment. Trey Edward Shults' Krisha followup is a psychological art house horror flick that demands patience from its audience in a slow-burn tale of two families fighting to maintain a semblance of safety and sanity in a world where social order has collapsed. Fueled by nerve-rattling tension and a simmering sense of impending doom, It Comes at Night is a flavor of existential dread that isn't for all tastes, but if you've got the disposition, it's a beautifully shot pensive tale of mortality and trauma that will leave you with plenty to mull over long after the credits role. 

8) The Lost City of Z 


James Gray often gets called a throwback director but The Lost City of Z is the furthest throw he's lobbed into cinema's great past. Percy Fawcett (Charlie Hunnam) is an undecorated military man who cannot receive advancement due to his "poor choice of relatives" but then captures the world's attention when he ventures into the Amazon to find an ancient civilization that might pre-date the Western world. It spans more than two decades of his life and Gray uses that time economically. It never feels like Z is rushing past important touchstones and it even stops to show how World War I-a Western war, for we are not that much more evolved than the Amazonian "savages" that Fawcett is constantly defending to the British Empire-marks time as something that's just as twisty and cruel as the Amazon River.
There are arrows, there's dissection of familial bloodlines and their importance to both the Western world and the native tribes, there's mist, there's a mumbly Robert Pattinson and an enunciation to the nosebleeds done by Hunnam. It's impeccably and economically paced. The expansive story places it in the realm of the thoughtful and immense profiles of greatness that David Lean used to make. But don't think that it isn't modern. Gray is attuned to ideas that would've been revolutionary not only in 1905 but also throughout most of Hollywood's history. It's about a small batch of white men who believe that their society and Empire is built on false pride. And the pride of their societal order not only looks down on other cultures they enslave, but it also starts global wars and keeps women in service to their partner's greatness-even at the expense of hiring an unqualified society man who they perceive can carry his weight simply due to his elevated rank. Gray might be making movies like he lived in the 1970s, but hes also making them great-for modern times-by taking the time to enhance the meaning underneath the grand adventure. 

9) Paterson 


Like Chantal Akerman's ascetic classic Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles, Jim Jarmusch's Patersonconcerns itself with routine. The film conditions you to jive with its particular rhythm, in part so you might feel the impact experienced by our hero when the unexpected punctuates what's regular in this average person's life. Only, where Jeanne Dielman depicted the day-in-day-out of working-class life as a monotonous horror show, Paterson takes an altogether different tack. To Jarmusch, the everyday existence of blue-collar individuals like bus driver-poet Paterson (Adam Driver)-whom we observe across a single week - is so simple as to be near transcendent. Paterson's a classic nice guy, but Driver helps us realize there's more going on beneath that exterior that's so cautious to offend. It's a turn of minor gestures that lacks the obvious Best Actor grandstanding to, say, win an Oscar, but rest assured Driver's performance is one of the most impressive of its year. As with Jarmusch's beguiling film on the whole, once acclimated, you continue to feel it long after you've left the cinema. 

10) Mississippi Grind 


Filmmakers Ryan Fleck and Anna Boden don't work within genres as much as they wander around inside them. Their Half Nelson took on the inspirational-teacher film, while Sugar had a darker, more realistic perspective on the prototypical sports movie. Repeatedly, the filmmaking duo utilize the tenets of a genre but mostly focus on their characters' specific desires, opening themselves up to criticism that their movies are too meandering for their own good. But oftentimes, those laid-back, intimate observations are where the most interesting things happen. Perhaps it's appropriate, then, that Fleck and Boden have finally gotten around to making a Robert Altman film. Altman, of course, was the king of the revisionist genre movie, and Fleck and Boden have taken his underrated 1974 gem California Split as their guide for Mississippi Grind, a low-key but affecting story about two gamblers on a car trip. To be sure, this terrain-addiction, the road movie, the buildup to the big competition-"has been explored plenty by other filmmakers. And, yet, moment to moment, Mississippi Grind digs into you. 
 

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